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Empress Eugénie’s Poodle (1850s). André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri.
Salted paper print from a glass negative. Metropolitan Museum. 

Empress Eugénie’s Poodle (1850s). André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri.

Salted paper print from a glass negative. Metropolitan Museum

— il y a 14 heures
#empress eugénie's poodle  #1850s  #andré adolphe eugène disdéri  #albumen print  #salted paper print  #photograph  #metropolitan museum of art 
anotherafrica:

Wangechi Mutu Takes On Transmutation As a New Form of Existentialism
On the eve of Wangechi Mutu’s solo show, ‘Nguva na Nyoka’ (Sirens and Serpents) opening this October 14 2014 at London’s Victoria Miro gallery, the artist shared candid thoughts and insights on her latest body of work with Another Africa’s Joyce Bidouzo-Coudray much like what inspired her to delve into Kenya’s rich folkloric mythologies:
"The fact that women have this option to turn into these myths, these powerful, indefinable creatures – especially in a place like the coast of Kenya where the traditionally patriarchal cultures of the African Mijikenda tribes prevail – is such a testament to all the possibilities of what a woman can do in a place where she is not actually permitted to do much. That is completely inspiring to me also as an artist. So that is why I dug into it." 
Wangechi Mutu
Source | anotherafrica.net
[© Wangechi Mutu. Even, 2014. ]
Image courtesy of Wangechi Mutu and Victoria Miro, London.
 
 ANOTHERAFRICA.NET |  TUMBLR |  FACEBOOK  |  TWITTER  |  INSTAGRAM

anotherafrica:

Wangechi Mutu Takes On Transmutation As a New Form of Existentialism

On the eve of Wangechi Mutu’s solo show, ‘Nguva na Nyoka’ (Sirens and Serpents) opening this October 14 2014 at London’s Victoria Miro gallery, the artist shared candid thoughts and insights on her latest body of work with Another Africa’s Joyce Bidouzo-Coudray much like what inspired her to delve into Kenya’s rich folkloric mythologies:

"The fact that women have this option to turn into these myths, these powerful, indefinable creatures – especially in a place like the coast of Kenya where the traditionally patriarchal cultures of the African Mijikenda tribes prevail – is such a testament to all the possibilities of what a woman can do in a place where she is not actually permitted to do much. That is completely inspiring to me also as an artist. So that is why I dug into it."

Wangechi Mutu

Source | anotherafrica.net

[© Wangechi Mutu. Even, 2014. ]

Image courtesy of Wangechi Mutu and Victoria Miro, London.

 

ANOTHERAFRICA.NET | TUMBLR | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

(via racialicious)

— il y a 6 jours avec 122 notes
#wangechi mutu  #even  #2014  #2000s 
Agony (1947). Arshile Gorky.
Oil on canvas. MoMA.

Agony (1947). Arshile Gorky.

Oil on canvas. MoMA.

— il y a 4 semaines avec 2 notes
#agony  #1947  #1940s  #arshile gorky  #oil  #moma  #museum of modern art 

cavetocanvas:

Whenever I visit art museums, I’m always fascinated by artist signatures and collect pictures of them on my phone. These are a sampling of some of the better known names from my visits to the Legion of Honor and de Young museums in San Francisco.

In order of appearance:

  1. Hans Cranach c. 1503-37
  2. John Singer Sargent
  3. Jean-Léon Gérôme
  4. William Adolphe Bouguereau
  5. Albert Bierstadt
  6. Thomas Moran
  7. Odilon Redon
  8. Pablo Picasso
  9. Auguste Rodin
  10. Pierre-Auguste Renoir
  11. Claude Monet
  12. Aaron Douglas
  13. Salvador Dalí

(via the-paintrist)

— il y a 4 semaines avec 4242 notes
#hans cranach  #John Singer Sargent  #jean-léon gérôme  #william adolphe bouguereau  #albert bierstadt  #thomas moran  #odilon redon  #pablo picasso  #auguste rodin  #pierre-auguste renoir  #claude monet  #aaron douglas  #salvador dalí  #signature 
Summation (1947). Arshile Gorky.
Pastel, pencil, and charcoal on buff paper mounted on composition board. MoMA.

Summation (1947). Arshile Gorky.

Pastel, pencil, and charcoal on buff paper mounted on composition board. MoMA.

— il y a 4 semaines
#summation  #1947  #1940s  #arshile gorky  #pastel  #pencil  #charcoal  #paper  #composition board  #moma  #museum of modern art 
Astoria (1958). Frank Stella. 
Enamel on canvas. MoMA. 

Astoria (1958). Frank Stella. 

Enamel on canvas. MoMA

— il y a 4 semaines
#astoria  #1958  #1950s  #frank stella  #enamel  #moma  #museum of modern art 
Study for Valle de los Caídos (1966). Frank Stella. 
Felt-tip pen and pencil on graph paper. MoMA.

Study for Valle de los Caídos (1966). Frank Stella. 

Felt-tip pen and pencil on graph paper. MoMA.

— il y a 1 mois avec 3 notes
#study for valle de los caídos  #1966  #1960s  #frank stella  #felt-tip pen  #pencil  #graph paper  #moma  #museum of modern art 
The Marriage of Reason and Squalor, II (1959). Frank Stella. 
Enamel on canvas. MoMA. 

The Marriage of Reason and Squalor, II (1959). Frank Stella. 

Enamel on canvas. MoMA

— il y a 1 mois avec 1 note
#the marriage of reason and squalor ii  #1959  #1950s  #frank stella  #enamel  #moma  #museum of modern art 
vividrain:

Phoebe Anna Traquair (1852 - 1936). Tapestry "The Progress of a Soul" (1893-1901)
Silk, gold and silver thread embroidery on linen.  National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh.
Phoebe Anna Traquair was an Irish artist who rose to prominence in Edinburgh and went on to produce a staggering volume of work. She was part of the Arts and Crafts movements in Scotland and worked in a number of disciplines including embroidery, jewellery making and metal work, painting, illustration and book design. She painted vast murals in several buildings including the Catholic Apostolic Church and the chapel of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, both in Edinburgh. Notably, she illuminated the book “Sonnets from the Portuguese” by the poet Elizabeth Barratt Browning, but she is probably best known today for her exquisite embroidered panels and drapes, the most spectacular of which “The Progress of a Soul” (part of which is seen above) now resides in the National Gallery of Scotland in Ediburgh.
Traquair is a unique figure in both British Art and the Arts and Crafts movement, and she has been identified as the first significant professional woman artist in modern Scotland.

vividrain:

Phoebe Anna Traquair (1852 - 1936). Tapestry "The Progress of a Soul" (1893-1901)

Silk, gold and silver thread embroidery on linen.
National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh.

Phoebe Anna Traquair was an Irish artist who rose to prominence in Edinburgh and went on to produce a staggering volume of work. She was part of the Arts and Crafts movements in Scotland and worked in a number of disciplines including embroidery, jewellery making and metal work, painting, illustration and book design. She painted vast murals in several buildings including the Catholic Apostolic Church and the chapel of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, both in Edinburgh. Notably, she illuminated the book “Sonnets from the Portuguese” by the poet Elizabeth Barratt Browning, but she is probably best known today for her exquisite embroidered panels and drapes, the most spectacular of which “The Progress of a Soul” (part of which is seen above) now resides in the National Gallery of Scotland in Ediburgh.

Traquair is a unique figure in both British Art and the Arts and Crafts movement, and she has been identified as the first significant professional woman artist in modern Scotland.

— il y a 1 mois avec 4 notes
#phoebe anna traquair  #silk  #gold  #silver  #linen  #the progress of a soul  #tapestry  #1893  #1890s  #1901  #1900s  #national gallery of scotland