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books0977:

Girl Holding a Book (c.1922). Gwen John (Welsh, 1876-1939). Oil on canvas. Smith College Museum of Art.
John worked in France for most of her career. Her paintings, mainly portraits of anonymous female sitters, are rendered in a range of closely related tones. This painting, Girl Holding a Book, is representative of her work.

books0977:

Girl Holding a Book (c.1922). Gwen John (Welsh, 1876-1939). Oil on canvas. Smith College Museum of Art.

John worked in France for most of her career. Her paintings, mainly portraits of anonymous female sitters, are rendered in a range of closely related tones. This painting, Girl Holding a Book, is representative of her work.

— il y a 2 semaines avec 71 notes
#girl holding a book  #1922  #1920s  #oil  #gwen john  #smith college museum of art 
Battle of Horsemen and Foot Soldiers (mid-16th century). Guglielmo della Porta. 
Pen and ink. Metropolitan Museum. 

Battle of Horsemen and Foot Soldiers (mid-16th century). Guglielmo della Porta. 

Pen and ink. Metropolitan Museum

— il y a 1 mois avec 1 note
#battle of horsemen and foot soldiers  #16th century  #guglielmo della porta  #pen  #ink  #metropolitan museum of art 
La Marquesa Casati (1920).  Federico Beltrán-Masses.
Oil on canvas.  Private Collection.
“Marchesa Luisa Casati was renowned for her eccentricity and hedonistic life style. She married young only to discover that the constraints of it didn’t suit her. Luisa returned intermittently to an affair with the wild Italian poet Gabriele d’Annunzio, while numbering both men and women among her other lovers. She was often seen promenading Paris and the Venetian canals around the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, on the Grand Canal (later also the home of Peggy Guggenheim; it today houses her collection) in only a fur coat, accompanied by two cheetahs. In an effort to make herself a ‘living work of art’ she commissioned portraits from, among others, Boldini, Kees Van Dongen, Jacques-Emile Blanche, Man Ray, Cecil Beaton and Baron de Mayer.” (x)
(via klimt-artwork)

La Marquesa Casati (1920).  Federico Beltrán-Masses.

Oil on canvas.  Private Collection.

Marchesa Luisa Casati was renowned for her eccentricity and hedonistic life style. She married young only to discover that the constraints of it didn’t suit her. Luisa returned intermittently to an affair with the wild Italian poet Gabriele d’Annunzio, while numbering both men and women among her other lovers. She was often seen promenading Paris and the Venetian canals around the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, on the Grand Canal (later also the home of Peggy Guggenheim; it today houses her collection) in only a fur coat, accompanied by two cheetahs. In an effort to make herself a ‘living work of art’ she commissioned portraits from, among others, Boldini, Kees Van Dongen, Jacques-Emile Blanche, Man Ray, Cecil Beaton and Baron de Mayer.” (x)

(via klimt-artwork)

— il y a 3 mois avec 11 notes
#la marquesa casati  #1920  #1920s  #luisa casati  #federico beltrán-masses  #oil  #private collection 
La Maja Marquesa (1915).  Federico Beltrán-Masses.
Oil on canvas.  Private Collection.
“Despite the extensive coverage given the painting upon its first exhibition, this triple portrait remains something of an enigma, the Maja Marquesa was well known in Spanish high-society for her distinguished ancestry, but equally well for her scandalous lesbian lifestyle. In allowing his nude Marquise, not simply a hired model, to be identified, Beltrán-Masses took a considerable risk. He broke yet another convention of the day by presenting her nude alongside clothed companions, as Manet had in Dejeuner sur l’Herbe more than thirty years earlier. However, it was the presentation of a recognised figure from high society wearing nothing but a mantilla – a headdress usually worn only on special occasions with the traditional dress - that caused particular outrage among the conservative members of the Comité. Nonetheless, only three of the critics writing in support of Beltrán in 1915 identified the sitter; the majority praised the painting on its merits as a work of art and condemned those who had opposed its exhibition as presiding over ‘a kingdom of mediocrity.’ When King Alfonso XIII and his elderly mother attended Beltrán’s exhibition in Madrid the following year at the Palace Hotel, the sovereign’s approval further demonstrated the foolishness of the Comité members.”  (x)
(via deviatesinc)

La Maja Marquesa (1915).  Federico Beltrán-Masses.

Oil on canvas.  Private Collection.

Despite the extensive coverage given the painting upon its first exhibition, this triple portrait remains something of an enigma, the Maja Marquesa was well known in Spanish high-society for her distinguished ancestry, but equally well for her scandalous lesbian lifestyle. In allowing his nude Marquise, not simply a hired model, to be identified, Beltrán-Masses took a considerable risk. He broke yet another convention of the day by presenting her nude alongside clothed companions, as Manet had in Dejeuner sur l’Herbe more than thirty years earlier. However, it was the presentation of a recognised figure from high society wearing nothing but a mantilla – a headdress usually worn only on special occasions with the traditional dress - that caused particular outrage among the conservative members of the Comité. Nonetheless, only three of the critics writing in support of Beltrán in 1915 identified the sitter; the majority praised the painting on its merits as a work of art and condemned those who had opposed its exhibition as presiding over ‘a kingdom of mediocrity.’ When King Alfonso XIII and his elderly mother attended Beltrán’s exhibition in Madrid the following year at the Palace Hotel, the sovereign’s approval further demonstrated the foolishness of the Comité members.”  (x)

(via deviatesinc)

— il y a 3 mois avec 113 notes
#la maja marquesa  #1915  #1910s  #federico beltrán-masses  #oil  #private collection 
Three Sketches of Windmills (n.d.) Frank Brangwyn.
Watercolor on paper.  William Morris Gallery. 

Three Sketches of Windmills (n.d.) Frank Brangwyn.

Watercolor on paper.  William Morris Gallery

— il y a 3 mois avec 2 notes
#three sketches of windmills  #frank brangwyn  #watercolor  #paper  #william morris gallery 
The Washerwomen (1915).  Frank Brangwyn.
Oil on canvas.  William Morris Gallery.

The Washerwomen (1915).  Frank Brangwyn.

Oil on canvas.  William Morris Gallery.

— il y a 3 mois avec 2 notes
#the washerwomen  #1915  #1910s  #frank brangwyn  #oil  #william morris gallery